Figuring out what to do after college can be uncertain and, at times, scary. For most people, their entire lives have revolved around school, so to not be in school anymore and having to worry about finding a job within your degree is a stressful change from the norm. As a graphic design student, the straightforward answer would be to become a graphic designer, but having a degree in this field opens up more opportunities than you’d initially believe. Graphic designers have a wide variety of jobs that they can pursue after graduation—here are just a few of those potential jobs. 

 

Graphic Designer

 

Starting with the obvious choice of job, getting a degree in graphic design means you can put it right to use by developing graphics and layouts for product illustrations, company logos, websites, advertisements, and so much more. Given that the job description is versatile, you could get a job in one industry, then find another job in a completely different industry. For example, you could be making magazine advertisements, layouts, and web designs one moment, then design and direct art for a video game publishing company the rest. The possibilities are endless.

 

Creative Director

 

Another possible option is to become a creative director. Creative directors are the visual masterminds of a project: they ensure that the overall aesthetic is consistent and understandable by leading a team to create their vision. This can apply to more tangible projects like video game, film, or magazine development, or extend to more abstract ideas like an advertising campaign or working on a company’s brand. To be a creative developer is to be a proficient manager, leader, and to have the ability to manage both budget and time in addition to the creative vision.

 

Production Artist

 

If you like to be hands-on while involved in a project, then you’ll have a place as a production artist. People on this career path are the ones who make each step of production possible in a range of mediums. They upload and ensure the accuracy of each design file for a project in the final stages of its development, making the job heavy in both design and computer application. Production artists overlook the final steps of a project, so they’re able to make suggestions on how to improve what they’re currently working on as well as make final, finishing touches such as scaling, cropping, retouching, and positioning. This job is perfect for people who want exposure to a variety of jobs, but it’s also great for people who really want to stretch their visual design skills to the limits.